Poll: Shorebird of the Year 2014

Northern Lapwing populations are rapidly decreasing in most part of Europe. © Gyorgy Szimuly

Northern Lapwing populations are rapidly decreasing in most part of Europe. © Gyorgy Szimuly

The aim of this poll is to select the ‘Shorebird of the Year’ in 2014. A species will be selected which gets the most votes until 01.8.2014. It will be in focus until the next World Shorebirds’ Day, when a new poll will be opened. This poll is not for fun only. All of the fundraising efforts will focus on the selected species for a year, so you can affect which shorebird species gets support.

When making your vote, don’t judge just by the cuteness or extravagant appearance of a species, but think about its conservation status, vulnerability or the exceptional behaviour it makes for survival.

Please make sure you add your own choice to the poll, in case you don’t see the bird in the list you wish to vote for! Try to avoid duplicates (e.g. if Eurasian Stone Curlew is in the list, don’t add Stone Curlew). Duplicates will be deleted.

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10 thoughts on “Poll: Shorebird of the Year 2014

  1. Pingback: Guess the species | World Shorebirds Day

  2. Red Knot would be good because of the documented migrations of B95 which would give a focus to the amazing journeys that shorebirds make. Also, its endangered status and dependence on Horseshoe Crabs would be a good lesson for preservation efforts and the interconnection of all species.

    • Americans should speed up then. I encourage everyone to vote. Fund raising efforts will focus on the selected species. All I can say, Red Knot not in the first place but can be. 😉

  3. Pingback: Shorebird Of The Year Deadline Extended | World Shorebirds' Day

  4. I think the Hudsonian Godwit makes a good choice. They span the Western Hemisphere on migration, limited population size, stunning to look at, and come on, it’s a Godwit.

  5. Lots of great birds, but I’m voting for the classy American Avocet–great flagship species for Great Plains and Intermountain West wetlands

  6. Pingback: Conservation: Find Out How You Can Help Track Shorebirds Along The Atlantic Coast

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